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New Bolton Center Update


New Bolton Center Lifts Equine Quarantine, Resumes Normal Operation-- February 6, 2018, 11:00 am

Contacts: Martin J. Hackett, Communications Director, mhackett@vet.upenn.edu; Hannah Kleckner, Communications Specialist, hkleck@vet.upenn.edu

The official quarantines imposed by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture on two barns at the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, have been lifted effective Saturday, February 3, 2018.

A self-imposed quarantine, approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, remains in effect on three horses that previously tested positive for EHV-1. These horses have remained stalled in an on-site isolation facility with dedicated staff that are entirely separate from personnel handling other horses.  Quarantine revocation testing for these three animals will begin Wednesday, February 7, 2018.

New Bolton Center has resumed normal operations and is currently admitting all equine elective and emergency patients with minimal restrictions. Additionally, all elective and emergency camelid cases are being admitted.

All cows, goats, sheep, or pig patients continue to be admitted to the hospital. Field Service operations remain unaffected and the Center will continue to receive appointments for non-equine animals. Reproductive services at the Hofmann Center are fully operational.

University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center Able to Admit Limited Types of Patients -- January 23, 2018, 2:45 pm; Updated: January 25, 2018, 1:00 pm

Contacts: Martin J. Hackett, Communications Director, mhackett@vet.upenn.edu; Hannah Kleckner, Communications Specialist, hkleck@vet.upenn.edu

In consultation with Dr. Aliza Simeone, Pennsylvania’s regional state veterinarian, New Bolton Center is admitting a limited number of patients whose management can be readily restricted to non-quarantined areas on the New Bolton Center campus.

New Bolton Center continues to uphold rigorous biosecurity measures following a case of equine herpes myeloencephalopathy (EHM). This will limit the number and type of patients admitted.  In an effort to best serve clients, New Bolton Center is offering limited specialized services, particularly to patients in which a delay in treatment may adversely affect outcome. New Bolton Center will continue to receive equine and camelid emergencies. All cow, sheep, goat, and pig patients will be admitted and discharged routinely. Field Service and Reproductive services at Hofmann Center remain fully operational.

On Tuesday, January 16th, a horse that had been hospitalized for an unrelated, medical issue developed signs compatible with EHM and tested positive for equine herpesvirus (EHV-1). Since then an additional febrile horse housed in an adjacent barn, as well as two asymptomatic horses housed in either the same or adjacent barns, have tested positive for EHV-1.

The three horses that have tested positive have been moved into the on-site, state-of-the art isolation facility with dedicated staff that are entirely separate from personnel handling other horses in the facility.  The barns they originally occupied remain quarantined.  All horses remain asymptomatic. In the two horses in which strain identification was pursued, the virus was found to be the ‘A Strain’, or community type virus, as opposed to the neuropathogenic ‘G Strain’.  While both strains can ultimately result in neurologic disease, outbreaks associated with the neuropathogenic strain tend to have a larger number of horses that are more severely affected.

EHM is the neurologic disease caused by equine herpesvirus (EHV-1).  The virus is shed primarily from the equine respiratory tract and is transmitted either by direct contact between horses, or from contact with contaminated hands, clothing, or other equipment shared between horses. Taking precautions such as changing outerwear between horses or equine properties, and wearing and changing gloves between animals, prevents transmission of the disease.

Many horses are latently infected making prevention difficult, but the virus does not persist for long in the environment and is sensitive to common disinfectants.  The disease does not affect humans or ruminants, but can negatively impact camelids.

New Bolton Center will continue to provide additional, regular, and timely information as it become available.

Update Regarding Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM) Quarantine at New Bolton Center -- January 19, 2018, 5:30 pm

Contacts: Martin J. Hackett, Communications Director, mhackett@vet.upenn.edu; Hannah Kleckner, Communications Specialist, hkleck@vet.upenn.edu

The University of Pennsylvania’s large animal hospital, New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, continues to work with state authorities to respond to the EHV-1 situation identified on January 16, 2018.

On Tuesday, January 16th, a horse that had been hospitalized for an unrelated medical issue developed signs compatible with equine herpes myeloencephalopathy (EHM) and tested positive for equine herpesvirus (EHV-1). Since then, an additional febrile horse housed in an adjacent barn has tested positive for EHV-1 and has been moved into the on-site, state-of-the-art isolation facility with dedicated staff that are entirely separate from any personnel handling the other horses. 

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has traced and quarantined horses suspected of having been exposed to the virus that had already left New Bolton Center prior to the diagnosis of EHM at that location.  In Pennsylvania, Orders of Special Quarantine have been posted at premises that received these potentially exposed animals to control the spread of this diseases.

Along with increased biosecurity, these locations are required to conduct twice daily temperature checks and monitor and report any horses showing signs of EHV-1 infection. As of the time of this publication, there have been no febrile or neurologic horses detected on the quarantined farms.

Another Pennsylvania premise that had contact with one of the EHV-1 positive horses prior to its hospitalization has also been quarantined.  In addition, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has provided information concerning horses from other states that may have been exposed to the virus to their respective State Animal Health Officials for follow-up. 

New Bolton Center will continue to receive equine or camelid emergency admissions only during this time; these patients can be discharged when clinically indicated. On Monday, in consultation with the regional state veterinarian, New Bolton Center will decide if elective equine patients can be admitted.

All cows, goats, sheep, or pig patients can continue to be admitted and discharged without restriction. Field Service operations are unaffected and the Center will continue to receive appointments for non-equine animals. Reproductive services at the Hofmann Center are fully operational.

New Bolton Center will provide additional, regular, and timely information as it becomes available.

For more information about EHM, please refer to https://aaep.org/guidelines/infectious-disease-control/equine-herpesvirus-resources.

Statement Regarding Equine Quarantine at the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center  

Contacts: Martin J. Hackett, Communications Director, mhackett@vet.upenn.edu; Hannah Kleckner, Communications Specialist, hkleck@vet.upenn.edu

[January 17, 2018, Philadelphia, PA] – The University of Pennsylvania’s large animal hospital, New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, is under a self-imposed equine quarantine for Equine Herpes Myeloencephalitis (EHM). New Bolton Center has canceled all elective, equine appointments pending further instructions from the regional state veterinarian.

New Bolton Center will receive equine or camelid (also susceptible to Equine Herpesvirus or EHV-1) emergency admissions only during this time. All cows, goats, sheep, or pig patients can be admitted and discharged without restriction. Field Service operations are unaffected and the Center will continue to receive appointments for non-equine animals. Reproductive services at the Hofmann Center are fully operational.

On Tuesday, January 16th, a horse recently admitted to the hospital for non-neurologic symptoms, tested positive for EHV-1, and was ultimately displaying signs compatible with EHM. Of particular relevance to the larger equine community, this horse had a non-traditional presentation for EHM; including a single low grade fever and several days of normal temperature prior to the development of neurologic signs.

New Bolton Center is working with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture to contain any possible spread of the infection and to determine the duration of the quarantine. Owners and referring veterinarians of the horses still at New Bolton are being notified and biosecurity measures have been implemented to protect hospitalized horses.

EHM is the neurologic disease caused by EHV-1, and is spread through the equine respiratory tract, predominantly through direct contact. Many horses are latently infected making prevention difficult, but the virus does not persist for long in the environment and is sensitive to common disinfectants. The disease does not affect humans or ruminants, but can negatively impact camelids.

New Bolton Center will provide additional, regular, and timely information as it becomes available.

For more information about EHM, visit https://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahss/equine/ehv/ehv_ehm_recommendations_051611.pdf