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Penn Vet to Provide Specialized Medical Care to Save Shelter Dogs’ Lives

By Ashley Berke Published: Mar 19, 2015
[March 19, 2015; Philadelphia, PA] – A generous gift from the Richard Lichter Charity for Dogs is helping to save the lives of shelter dogs in need of specialized medical care. Through the Shelter Dog Specialty Medical Treatment Project, experts at Penn Vet will provide life-saving, specialty care to dogs in partnering shelters that are at risk for euthanasia. The dogs will be selected through the Penn Vet Shelter Animal Medicine Program and treated at Penn Vet’s Ryan Hospital.

Dr. Debbie Mandell examines a shelter dog.Once a dog is approved for the program, Penn Vet will provide all medical and diagnostic services necessary to treat the condition. After treatment, the dog will be placed in foster care and become available for adoption. 

“We were incredibly moved when Richard Lichter came to us with a vision for this program and a generous offer to support it,” said Dr. Brittany Watson, Director of Shelter Animal Medicine and Community Engagement. “This is an opportunity for Penn Vet’s Shelter Medicine Program, Ryan Hospital, and area shelters to partner in saving the community’s most vulnerable dogs.”

The first dogs saved through the Shelter Dog Specialty Medical Treatment Project were brought to Penn Vet this month. Animal Care & Control Team of Philadelphia (ACCT Philly) identified four pit bull-mix puppies that had severe vaccination reactions. The puppies were having seizures and vomiting, so they were rushed to Ryan Hospital’s Emergency Service. The pups were not actively seizuring upon arrival, but they were lethargic and showed signs of abnormal mentation. They were placed on IV fluids, received anti-nausea medications and Benadryl, and were hospitalized with supportive care for two nights. One puppy has already been adopted by a Penn Vet technician who cared for him at Ryan Hospital. The other three puppies are currently in foster homes while they await adoption. To view the adoption profiles of animals available for adoption at ACCT Philly, click here.

“I am delighted with the start of the Shelter Dog Specialty Medical Treatment Project,” said Richard Lichter. “This partnership with Penn Vet, which has incredible veterinary specialists and emergency care, has enabled four puppies without families and without hope to have another chance at life.”

About the Penn Vet Shelter Animal Medicine Program

Established in 2006, the Penn Vet Shelter Animal Medicine Program programs consultative, educational, and veterinary support to regional shelters and residents of the Greater Philadelphia community. The program has a significant impact on how many homeless animals are given quality care and placed into permanent homes. In addition, the program provides interdisciplinary and authentic instruction to veterinary students through the lens of shelter medicine, by integrating best practices in educational techniques and research with community outreach, collaborative partnerships, and service learning.

About Penn Vet

Penn Vet is a global leader in veterinary medicine education, research, and clinical care. Founded in 1884, Penn Vet is the only veterinary school developed in association with a medical school. The school is a proud member of the One Health Initiative, linking human, animal, and environmental health.

Penn Vet serves a diverse population of animals at its two campuses, which include extensive diagnostic and research laboratories. Ryan Hospital in Philadelphia provides care for dogs, cats, and other domestic/companion animals, handling more than 31,000 patient visits a year. New Bolton Center, Penn Vet’s large-animal hospital on nearly 700 acres in rural Kennett Square, PA, cares for horses and livestock/farm animals. The hospital handles more than 4,000 patient visits a year, while the Field Service treats nearly 36,000 patients at local farms. In addition, New Bolton Center’s campus includes a swine center, working dairy, and poultry unit that provide valuable research for the agriculture industry. 

For more information, visit www.vet.upenn.edu.

 

About Penn Vet

Ranked among the top ten veterinary schools worldwide, the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) is a global leader in veterinary education, research, and clinical care. Founded in 1884, Penn Vet is the first veterinary school developed in association with a medical school. The school is a proud member of the One Health initiative, linking human, animal, and environmental health.

Penn Vet serves a diverse population of animals at its two campuses, which include extensive diagnostic and research laboratories. Ryan Hospital in Philadelphia provides care for dogs, cats, and other domestic/companion animals, handling nearly 35,000 patient visits a year. New Bolton Center, Penn Vet’s large-animal hospital on nearly 700 acres in rural Kennett Square, PA, cares for horses and livestock/farm animals. The hospital handles nearly 4,900 patient visits a year, while the Field Service treats more than 38,000 patients at local farms. In addition, New Bolton Center’s campus includes a swine center, working dairy, and poultry unit that provide valuable research for the agriculture industry.

Media Contacts

Martin Hackett
Director of Communications and Marketing
mhackett@vet.upenn.edu
215-898-1475

John Donges
Communications Coordinator
jdonges@vet.upenn.edu
215-898-4234

Hannah Kleckner
Communications Specialist for New Bolton Center
hkleck@vet.upenn.edu
610-925-6241