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Ryan Hospital Philadelphia, PA
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Agenda:
Thursday, September 28, 2017


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Contact Us

Brittany Tinsley
penn-conference@vet.upenn.edu
Phone: 215-746-2421

Penn Annual Conference
School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
3800 Spruce Street, Suite 172E
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Companion Animal Track I
9-10am 10:15-11:15am 11:30am-12:30pm 12:30-1:30pm 1:45-2:45pm 3-4pm

Title TBD

Dr. Nicola Mason


Low Stress
Techniques in
the Veterinary Clinic I

Dr. Wailani Sung

Low Stress
Techniques
in the Veterinary Clinic II

Dr. Wailani Sung

Keynote Luncheon: Critical Care

Dr. Daniel Fletcher

Molecular
Therapies
for Nervous System Disease

Dr. Charles Vite

SMART Neuro
and the Atlantoaxial Luxation Challenge

Dr. Evelyn Galban and Dr. Jonathan Wood

  • Companion Animal Track I: Descriptions

    (9-10am)

    Dr. Nicola Mason

    Mellow Mutts and Calm Cats: Incorporating Low Stress Techniques in the Veterinary Clinic (10:15-11:15am)

    As veterinary medicine has evolved and improved through the years, veterinary behavioral medicine has evolved and gained in importance and value.  It is widely recognized that our patients’ experiences in our examination rooms contribute to their future cooperative behavior at their next visit.  How can we create a less stressful veterinary visit to encourage client retention and maintain the cooperation of our veterinary patients?  Our patients’ experience in our hospital starts as soon as they enter through the front door.  We will review a few simple modifications you can implement that will help make the visit more pleasant for both your patients and clients.  We will learn how to recognize the signs of fear, anxiety and stress in both our canine and feline patients and what we can do to decrease these negative experiences.  We will review handling techniques that can be less stressful for our patients yet allow us to safely restrain and perform necessary procedures. 

    Dr. Wailani Sung

    Mellow Mutts and Calm Cats: Incorporating Low Stress Techniques in the Veterinary Clinic II  (11:30am-12:30pm)

    As veterinary medicine has evolved and improved through the years, veterinary behavioral medicine has evolved and gained in importance and value.  It is widely recognized that our patients’ experiences in our examination rooms contribute to their future cooperative behavior at their next visit.  How can we create a less stressful veterinary visit to encourage client retention and maintain the cooperation of our veterinary patients?  Our patients’ experience in our hospital starts as soon as they enter through the front door.  We will review a few simple modifications you can implement that will help make the visit more pleasant for both your patients and clients.  We will learn how to recognize the signs of fear, anxiety and stress in both our canine and feline patients and what we can do to decrease these negative experiences.  We will review handling techniques that can be less stressful for our patients yet allow us to safely restrain and perform necessary procedures. 

    Dr. Wailani Sung

    Molecular Therapies for Nervous System Disease (1:45-2:45pm)

    Developing molecular therapies for nervous system disease.  These therapies include gene therapy and gene editing to treat disease or to stop disease from occurring.

    Dr. Charles Vite

    SMART Neuro and the Atlantoaxial Luxation Challenge (3-4pm)

    In this interactive session we will introduce the principles of innovation practiced in the Neurology and Neurosurgery section at Penn Vet and invite conference participants to participate in this process. The concepts behind our endeavor: simulation, modeling, animation, reconstruction and transformation are best summed as the SMART Neuro process. We can apply these principles to all three pillars of our mission: research, teaching, and clinical work to move the field forward through innovation. During our session we will critically evaluate the problem of atlanto-axial luxation in small animals through the process of SMART Neuro and, as a team, work to change the way we research, teach, and treat the disease.

    Dr. Evelyn Galban & Dr. Jonathan Wood

     

Companion Animal Track II
9-10am 10:15-11:15am 11:30am-12:30pm 12:30-1:30pm 1:45-2:45pm 3-4pm

Initial Approach to the Emergent Respiratory Patient

Dr. Vincent Thawley

Monitoring the Microcirculation in Critical Illness

Dr. Deborah Silverstein

Anesthesia for the
Critical Patient

Dr. Sheilah Robertson

Keynote Luncheon: Critical Care

Dr. Daniel Fletcher

Ocular Emergencies

Dr. Brady Beale

Interventional Radiology

Dr. Dana Clarke

  • Companion Animal Track II: Descriptions

    Initial Approach to the Emergent Respiratory Patient (9-10am)

    Respiratory distress is a commonly encountered, and truly life-threatening, emergency presentation. Successful management of the emergent respiratory patient is contingent upon rapid assessment and stabilization, and action taken during the first minutes to hours often has a major impact on patient outcome. While diagnostic imaging is undoubtedly a crucial part of the workup, patients at presentation may be too unstable to safely achieve imaging and clinicians may be called upon to institute empiric therapy based primarily on history, physical exam and limited diagnostics. This lecture will cover the initial evaluation and stabilization of the emergent respiratory patient, with a particular emphasis on clues from the physical exam that may help localize the cause of respiratory distress. Additionally, we will discuss ‘cage-side’ diagnostics, including ultrasound and cardiac biomarkers, which may be useful in the working up these patients.

    Dr. Vincent Thawley

    It's the Small Stuff that Counts: Monitoring the Microcirculation in Critical Illness
    (10:15-11:15am)

    This session will discuss the differences between the macrocirculation and microcirculation, how they are monitored in critically ill patients, and the significance of the microcirculation in the pathophysiology of severe illness. Videomicroscopic techniques to monitor the microcirculation will be presented.

    Dr. Deborah Silverstein

    Anesthesia for the Critical Patient (11:30am-12:30pm)

    The care of critically ill patient requiring anesthesia can be very challenging due to their physical status. Check lists decrease human error and improve outcome and play a vital role when caring for a critically ill patient. The goals are to maintain cardiac output, perfusion and oxygen delivery as close to normal values as possible which requires choosing inotropic and pressor drugs carefully. Infusions of opioids, lidocaine, ketamine and minimal use of inhalant agents forms the basis of most “critical patient” anesthetic protocols. Decreasing perioperative fear and anxiety and focusing on patient comfort contribute to positive outcomes.

    Dr. Sheilah Robertson

    Ocular Emergencies (1:45-2:45pm)

    Ocular emergencies can range from mild conjunctivitis to an acute globe perforation. This lecture provides practical clinical information to diagnose and treat the most common eye conditions that present on an emergency basis.   From corneal ulcers to glaucoma to sudden blindness, the material will include recent advancements in medical and surgical management options.

    Dr. Brady Beale

    Interventional Radiology (3-4pm)

    Dr. Dana Clarke

Veterinary Technician Track
9-10am 10:15-11:15am 11:30am-12:30pm 12:30-1:30pm 1:45-2:45pm 3-4pm

The Colloid Controvery

Amy Newfield

Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

Amy Newfield

The "Fax" (Facts) About Alfaxalone

Donna Sisak

Keynote Luncheon: Critical Care

Dr. Daniel Fletcher

Much Ado - To Get To - A Smooth Recovery

Donna Sisak

The Top 5 Anesthetic Complications

Donna Sisak

  • Vet Tech Track: Descriptions

    The Colloid Controversy (9-10am)

    With the advances of medicine new and exciting colloids are available.   The biggest debate now is, "should we be using synthetic colloids?"  This lecture will dive into that debate. Attendees will learn about both natural (blood products) and synthetic colloids and how they are utilized in veterinary medicine.  They will leave understanding the risks and benefits of all colloid products and will be able to better monitor their patients.

    Amy Newfield

    Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury (10:15-11:15am)

    How is it possible that returning blood supply back to an area where it was cut off could kill an animal? Ischemia-reperfusion injury produces a chain of devastating events and is a relatively new exciting topic in veterinary medicine. Attendees will learn about this devastating syndrome, how it affects patients and ways to prevent it. Case studies will be discussed.

    Amy Newfield

    The "Fax" (Facts) About Alfaxalone (11:30am-12:30pm)

    A complete General Anesthetic event consists of:  pre-anesthetic evaluation/premedication, induction, maintenance, and recovery.  All are of equal importance.  With focus on the induction period – the transition from AWAKE TO ANESTHETIZED.   It is vital that the anesthetist act quickly (and safely) during intubation (endotracheal tube placement) to insure adequate oxygenation and ventilation to the patient.  An ideal induction agent consists of:  rapid onset of action, minimal cardiopulmonary effects, and rapid metabolism.  This presentation will discuss a recently approved – “new kid in town” anesthetic agent, Alfaxalone.   The focus of this session is to familiarize the audience with this agent – description, indications of use, and dosages- for use during an anesthetic event.  Advantages and disadvantages will also be mentioned.

    Donna Sisak

    Much Ado - To Get To - A Smooth Recovery (1:45pm-2:45pm)

    The recovery period of an anesthetic event begins when anesthetic drug administration is discontinued and extubation (removal of the endotracheal tube) of the patient is achieved.  Monitoring of the patient in recovery should continue for at least a few hours; the patient should be “waking up and warming up”.  During this time sedation and respiratory depression put the patient at risk for potential post-anesthetic complications/death.  Studies have shown that most anesthetic mortalities occur during the recovery period.  This presentation will focus on enhancing and improving anesthetic care during the recovery period in order to minimize complications.  This session will remind the audience the importance of promoting a smooth recovery by discussing:  preanesthetic patient preparation, designing a “balanced” anesthetic protocol (general anesthesia vs sedation) and suggest monitoring guidelines/parameters (oxygenation, ventilation, circulation) to observe of the recovering patient. 

    Donna Sisak

    The Top 5 Anesthetic Complications (3-4pm)

    As we prepare for an anesthetic event we respect the knowledge and skill required by the anesthetist to monitor and manage a patient to a successful outcome.  The anesthetist should have a general understanding of:  the anesthetic agents, methods for delivering (and assessing) the anesthetic agent, and the appropriate action required in the event of an anesthetic-related complication/emergency.   Despite thorough patient monitoring/supportive care by an astute anesthetist complications can still occur.  This presentation will discuss the top five anesthetic complications that can occur during an anesthetic event and suggested treatment therapies to improve outcome.

    Donna Sisak
Equine Track
9-10am 10:15-11:15am 11:30am-12:30pm 12:30-1:30pm 1:45-2:45pm 3-4pm

New Developments
in our Understanding
of What Causes
Different Forms of Laminitis

Dr. Andrew Van Eps

Current Approaches
to Prevention and Treatment of Laminitis

Dr. Andrew Van Eps

A Potpourri of
Advances in Equine Reproduction

Dr. Tamara Dobbie

Keynote Luncheon: Critical Care

Dr. Daniel Fletcher

Hemorrhage: When to Worry, When to
Transfuse, When to Refer

Dr. Maia Aitken

What's New in Colic Surgery

Dr. Maia Aitken

  • Equine Track: Descriptions

    New Developments in our Understanding of What Causes Different Forms of Laminitis (9-10am)

    The session will focus on delivering and discussing the latest information from laminitis research relevant to clinical practice.  New developments in our understanding of what causes the different forms of laminitis will be discussed, followed by approaches to prevention and treatment of the different forms of laminitis.

    Dr. Andrew Van Eps

    Current Approaches to Prevention and Treatment of Laminitis (10:15-11:15am)

    The session will focus on delivering and discussing the latest information from laminitis research relevant to clinical practice.  New developments in our understanding of what causes the different forms of laminitis will be discussed, followed by approaches to prevention and treatment of the different forms of laminitis.

    Dr. Andrew Van Eps

    A Potpourri of Advances in Equine Reproduction (11:30am-12:30pm)

    This session will cover a variety of timely topics on equine reproduction, including:

    - Harvesting and handling of testicles from a recently deceased or castrated stallion for epididymal sperm recovery and cryopreservation.
    - Harvesting and handling ovaries from an ill or recently deceased mare for oocyte recovery and ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection)
    - Using the “hose technique” to treat retained fetal membranes in mares

    Dr. Tamara Dobbie

    Hemorrhage: When to Worry, When to Transfuse, When to Refer (1:45-2:45pm)

    Dr. Maia Aitken

    What's New in Colic Surgery (3-4pm)

    Dr. Maia Aitken

Food Animal Track
9-10am 10:15-11:15am 11:30am-12:30pm 12:30-1:30pm 1:45-2:45pm 3-4pm

Parasites in Small Ruminants

Dr. Michael Pesato


Field Anesthesia and Analgesia in Cattle

Dr. Sarah Depenbrock


Field Applications of Ultrasound in Cattle

Dr. Sarah Depenbrock


Keynote Luncheon: Critical Care

Dr. Daniel Fletcher

 

Management of the Colicky Cow

Dr. Sarah Depenbrock

 

Selected Field Cases and Discussion

Dr. Depenbrock and Dr. Pesato

  • Food Animal Track: Descriptions

    Parasites in Small Ruminants (9-10am)

    Small ruminant parasitism is of big concern for both owners and practitioners alike. This talk will provide a practical look into dealing with parasitism in the field as well as insight into the most common parasites affecting small ruminants, the prevention techniques available, and the main treatment options.

    Dr. Michael Pesato

    Field Anesthesia and Analgesia in Cattle (10:15-11:15am)

    This session will review some basics of pain management in cattle, as well as some simple techniques that can be used in the field.  Updates from the recent literature on this topic will also be provided.

    Dr. Sarah Depenbrock

    Field Applications of Ultrasound in Cattle (11:30am-12:30pm)

    Today we’re taking your ultrasound probes beyond the rectum! The use of ultrasound technology for reproductive work is growing in popularity among livestock practitioners; but why stop there?  In this session, we’ll discuss techniques for examining sites other than the reproductive tract that you can use with your portable ultrasound.

    Dr. Sarah Depenbrock

    Management of the Colicky Cow (1:45-2:45pm)

    Painful abdominal conditions of cattle can present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in our stoic bovine patients. This session will use a problem based approach to review diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for a selection of abdominal conditions in cattle. 

    Dr. Sarah Depenbrock

    Select Field Cases and Discussion (3-4pm)

    We’re taking you on the road to see some of our interesting cases from the field. This session will take you on a tour of different clinical presentations of food animal field service cases. Some common and some not-so-common conditions will be discussed. So buckle up and put on those coveralls and boots; we’re heading to the farm!

    Dr. Sarah Depenbrock and Dr. Michael Pesato