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New Bolton Center Kennett Square, PA
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Ryan Hospital Philadelphia, PA
Emergencies:
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Agenda:
Wednesday, September 27, 2017


Emergencies

Contact Us

Brittany Tinsley
penn-conference@vet.upenn.edu
Phone: 215-746-2421

Penn Annual Conference
School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
3800 Spruce Street, Suite 172E
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Companion Animal Track I
9-10am 10:15-11:15am 
11:30-12:30pm 12:45-1:45pm
2:-3pm 3:15-4:15pm  4:30-5:30pm

Innovations at the Forefront of Veterinary Clinical Microbiology

Dr. Stephen Cole

Changes in the Gut Microbiome

Dr. Daniel Beiting

Advanced Diagnostic Imaging in Small Animals

Dr. Jenn Reetz

Keynote Luncheon:

The New Face of Clinical Academia

Dr. Oliver Garden

Innovations in Cutaneous Wound Care

Dr. Sue Volk

Future in Wound Management

Dr. Michael Mison

New Drug Therapies for Vexing Skin Diseases

Dr. Daniel Morris

  • Companion Animal Track I: Descriptions


    A New Culture: Innovations at the Forefront of Veterinary Clinical Microbiology (9-10am)

    With rising antimicrobial resistance rates and an increasing immunocompromised pet population, it is more important than ever to employ new technologies to diagnose infectious diseases. Advanced, rapid technologies are quickly becoming critical to both the veterinary clinical microbiologist and the clinician.  This presentation will compare and contrast classic tests with new technologies and lay out what the implications are for both practitioners and our patients.  New data from our lab will include research into the use of the Luminex platform (bead-based PCR assay) to diagnose agents of granulomatous disease, transcriptomic investigations into managing UTI and the use of MALDI-tof technology for bacterial identification.

    Dr. Stephen Cole

    Good Bugs, Bad Bugs: Changes in the Gut Microbiome Associated with Treatment and Remission of Canine Chronic Enteritis (10:15-11:15am)

    The healthy canine intestine is home hundreds of bacterial species, the vast majority of which have not previously been studied and are not readily cultured.  Although this ‘microbiome’ is now believed to be a critical determinant of health and disease, there is need to understand exactly which organisms may causes disease, and which are associated with intestinal healing.  In this session, Dr. Beiting will discuss the methods used to collect generate a census of the microbiome, and will detail work carried out in collaboration with Dr. Mark Rondeau at PennVet’s Ryan Hospital that used these methods to examine changes in the microbiome of dogs being treated for chronic enteritis.  The results of this study highlight specific bacteria that may serve as the target for future therapeutics or diagnostics.

    Dr. Daniel Beiting

    Advanced Diagnostic Imaging in Small Animals -  What are Some of the Increasingly Common Uses? (11:30am-12:30pm)

    This lecture will describe some of the increasingly common uses for advanced diagnostic imaging in small animals, focusing on CT, MRI and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. A brief introduction of each imaging modality will be followed by a case-based discussion of their utility in a variety of disease conditions. A brief description of newer modalities in advanced diagnostic imaging will also be presented.

    Dr. Jennifer Reetz and Dr. Ana Ceceres

    Innovations in Cutaneous Wound Care (2pm-3pm)

    Wound healing complications can be challenging to manage in small animal practice.  This session will focus on recent innovations in cutaneous wound care that may improve clinical outcomes in veterinary patients.

    Dr. Sue Volk

    Future in Wound Management (3:15-4:15pm)

    Dr. Michael Mison

    Exciting New Drug Therapies for Vexing Skin Diseases (4:30-5:30pm)

    This session will discuss the use of IL-31 inhibitors for the treatment of atopic dermatitis in dogs, and the isoxazoline class of anti-parasitic agents (fluralaner, afoxolaner, sarolaner) for treatment of canine and feline ectoparasitisms.

    Dr. Daniel Morris
Companion Animal Track II
9-10am 10:15-11:15am 
11:30-12:30pm 12:45-1:45pm
2:-3pm 3:15-4:15pm  4:30-5:30pm

Advances in Minimally Invasive Surgery for Cystic & Urethral Calculi

Dr. Jeffrey Runge

Minimally Invasive Orthopedic Surgery: Fracture Repair & Arthroscopy

Dr. Kim Agnello

Innovations in Analgesia

Dr. Sheilah Robertson

Keynote Luncheon:

The New Face of Clinical Academia

Dr. Oliver Garden

Working with Working Dogs

Dr. Cynthia Otto

Low-stress Handling

Dr. Lena Provoost

Parasite Prevention and Treatment

Dr. Clarissa Lyon

  • Companion Animal Track II: Descriptions

    Advances in Minimally Invasive Surgery for Cystic and Urethral Calculi (9-10am)

    This lecture is designed to discuss the topic of MIS lower urinary tract stone removal. We will focus primary on Laparoscopic Assisted Stone retrieval for the bladder and the urethra. Discussion will include patient selection, equipment, operative procedures and post-op care.

    Dr. Jeffrey Runge

    Minimally Invasive Orthopedic Surgery: Fracture Repair and Arthroscopy (10:15-11:15am)

    This talk will discuss the basic principles of these surgical techniques and the evidence supporting their use as compared to open surgical procedures.

    Dr. Kim Agnello

    Innovations in Analgesia (11:30am-12:30pm)

    Recent advances in analgesia include validated acute pain scales including facial expressions, new drugs and new formulations of old drugs specifically for cats. New drugs have come to market that block inflammatory pathways at distant “end points” leaving important physiological pathways intact. Locoregional techniques are gaining ground and long acting local anesthetics have received market authorization for dogs. Innovations for chronic pain include targeted approaches such as feline and canine monoclonal antibodies. This is an exciting time for everyone working to prevent and relieve pain in companion animals.

    Dr. Sheilah Robertson

    Working with Working Dogs (2-3pm)

    What do these dogs do and how can we support them as veterinarians? Topics will include aspects of occupational hazards, low stress handling and special needs of working/service dog handlers.

    Dr. Cynthia Otto

    Accepting the Challenge of Low Stress Veterinary Visits for Companion Animals (3:15-4:15pm)

    Routine veterinary care aims to ensure the health of companion animals. However, veterinary visits are often a source of distress among our animal patients and their caretakers. Elevations of vital parameters and stress signs occur in companion animals while at the veterinary hospital versus their home environment. These changes can alter our ability to adequately assess our patients and cause caretakers to avoid routine medical care for their pets. An understanding of stress signs, neurologic impact of acute stress, and learning theory can aide in better understanding our patients and developing methods to reduce their distress associated with veterinary visits.

    Dr. Lena Provoost

    Parasite Prevention and Treatment (4:30-5:30pm)

    Dr. Clarissa Lyon

Veterinary Technician Track
9-10am 10:15-11:15am 
11:30-12:30pm 12:45-1:45pm
2:-3pm 3:15-4:15pm  4:30-5:30pm

Acid Base

Colleen Rees

Holiday Toxicities

Denise Mulholland

East meets West: Integrating Nursing Techniques

Denise Mulholland

Keynote Luncheon:

The New Face of Clinical Academia

Dr. Oliver Garden

Pediatric Emergencies

Joseph DeFulio

Vascular Access

Joseph DeFulio

 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Joseph DeFulio

  • Vet Tech Track: Descriptions

    Acid Base (9-10am)

    The goal of this lecture is to provide technicians with a better understanding of acid-base and the interpretation of blood gas results. By reviewing the basic principles behind these concepts and going over the more complicated facets of blood gas analysis, technicians should come away feeling more confident in their understanding of results and what that means for patient care. By the end of this lecture, technicians should have a firm grasp on the four basic types of acid-base disturbances, the normal values for blood gases, how to interpret blood gas results, and how to put all of this into practice with a few real case examples.

    Colleen Rees

    Holiday Toxicities (10:15-11:15am)

    Definition, Pathophysiology, Systems Affected, Signs, Causes, Risk Factors, Diagnostics, Disease Progression\Time Frame, Treatment\Commonly Used Drugs, Role of the Technician and Prognosis. What can the technician expect: an order of operations from phone triage to initial treatment, proper stabilization techniques and monitoring techniques and nursing care.

    Denise Mulholland

    East meets West: Integrating Nursing Techniques (11:30-12:30pm)

    This session will cover a brief overview of traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine, patient care from an eastern medicine perspective, combining knowledge and techniques from both eastern and western medicine and client education.

    Denise Mulholland

    Pediatric Emergencies (2:00-3:00pm)

    Joseph DeFulio


    Vascular Access (3:15-4:15pm)

    Joseph DeFulio


    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (4:30-5:30pm)

    Joseph DeFulio


Equine Track
9-10am 10:15-11:15am 
11:30-12:30pm 12:45-1:45pm
2:-3pm 3:15-4:15pm  4:30-5:30pm

Use of 3D Printing in Veterinary Medicine

Dr. Kathryn Wulster


One Year into Standing Robotic CT, What Have We Learned

Dr. Kathryn Wulster


Equine Drug Testing in the 21st Century

Dr. Mary Robinson

Keynote Luncheon: The New Face of Clinical Academia

Dr. Oliver Garden

Regenerative Medicine in the Equine Athlete

Dr. Kyla Ortved

Stem Cell Therapy for Musculo-skeletal Injuries

Dr. Kyla Ortved


Do Horses Really Have Heart Attacks? Aortic Rupture in the Sport Horse

Dr. Kara Brown

  • Equine Track: Descriptions


    Use of 3D Printing in Veterinary Medicine (9-10am)

    Dr. Kathryn Wulster

    One Year into Standing Robotic CT, What Have We Learned (10:15-11:15am)

    Dr. Kathryn Wulster

    Equine Drug Testing in the 21st Century (11:30am-12:30pm)

    This session will discuss the advantages and challenges of performing "Equine Drug Testing in the 21st Century."  The impact of new technologies on drug testing, and consequently on the practice of veterinary medicine, will be discussed.  The information required to estimate a withdrawal time will be outlined with examples.

    Dr. Mary Robinson

    Regenerative Medicine in the Equine Athlete (2-3pm)

    The varying types of regenerative medicine and their application in the equine athlete will be discussed  She will provide in depth information on new orthobiologics including stem cells, PRP, and IRAP, and their use in musculoskeletal injuries. Current research into the use of each modality will be discussed.

    Dr. Kyla Ortved

    Stem Cell Therapy for Musculoskeletal Injuries (3:15-4:15pm)

    A seminar focused on the current state of stem cell therapy for use in equine musculoskeletal injuries. The seminar will include an overview of the different types and sources of stem cells, as well as how to obtain them in the clinic. Review of the literature regarding the use of stem cells will be included.

    Dr. Kyla Ortved

    Do Horses Really Have Heart Attacks? Aortic Rupture in the Sport Horse (4:30-5:30pm)

    Cardiovascular conditions in horses, such as aortic root rupture, can have significant effects on athletic performance, and sometimes dire consequences.   Aortic rupture is continually gaining media attention in the sport horse community, and the ability to recognize this condition becomes ever more important for the sport horse practitioner.  This session will discuss the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, treatment and prognosis for horses with aortic rupture, with comparisons to the condition in humans.

    Dr. Kara Brown
Food Animal Track
9-10am 10:15-11:15am 
11:30-12:30pm 12:45-1:45pm
2:-3pm 3:15-4:15pm  4:30-5:30pm

Socially Acceptable Animal Agriculture: Opportunities for the Veterinary Profession

Dr. Tom Parsons

Pig's Eye View: An Animal-Centric Perspective

Dr. Tom Parsons

Swine Parasite Control and Vaccination Programs

Dr. Meghann Pierdon

Keynote Luncheon: The New Face of Clinical Academia

Dr. Oliver Garden

Management of Dystocia in Small Ruminants

Dr. Marie-Eve Fecteau

Urolithiasis in Small Ruminants

Dr. Marie-Eve Fecteau

Common Orthopedic Problems in Small Ruminants

Dr. Marie-Eve Fecteau

  • Food Animal Track: Descriptions

    Socially Acceptable Animal Agriculture: Opportunities for the Veterinary Profession (9-10am)

    Both legislative initiatives and market forces are at play to translate evolving societal expectations about animal agriculture into changes on the farm.   This presentation will review some of the agents of change in this arena and highlight how the changing landscape that spans from farm to fork is creating new opportunities for interested veterinarians.

    Dr. Tom Parsons

    Pig's Eye View: An Animal-Centric Perspective on Modern Husbandry Practices (10:15-11:15am)

    There are many dissonant voices addressing how farm animals should be raised.  The Penn Vet Swine Center has tried to create a nexus for constructive dialogs between these different stakeholders.   We have engaged both animal advocacy and animal agriculture groups.  It is rare for a single identity to have financial support of their work from both camps.   Despite efforts to create a dialog, we would argue that there is one forgotten voice in these discussions about food security and animal welfare and that is the voice of the pigs themselves.  In this session, we will describe the Penn Vet Swine Center’s efforts to understand animal welfare via a pig’s eye view.

    Dr. Tom Parsons

    Swine Parasite Control and Vaccination Programs (11:30-12:30pm)

    This session will cover appropriate vaccination and parasite control programs for swine. Since disease challenges vary it will cover back yard pigs as well as those housed in other systems. Attendees should leave the session with concrete preventive care protocols for swine in different scenarios.

    Dr. Meghann Pierdon

    Management of Dystocia in Small Ruminants (2-3pm)

    The most common causes of dystocia in small ruminants will be reviewed.  This lecture will also cover the indications, techniques, and expected outcomes for cesarean section in small ruminants 

    Dr. Marie-Eve Fecteau

    Urolithiasis in Small Ruminants (3:15-4:15pm)

    This session will discuss pathophysiology, clinical signs, diagnostic procedures, surgical treatment, outcome, and possible complications related to urolithiasis in small ruminants. 

    Dr. Marie-Eve Fecteau

    Common Orthopedic Problems in Small Ruminants (4:30-5:30pm)

    This session will review and discuss the most common causes orthopedic injuries in small ruminants.  How to treat in the field? What should be referred in?  What are the expected outcomes?

    Dr. Marie-Eve Fecteau
2017 Business Track
9-11:15am 11:30am-12:30pm 12:45-1:45pm 2-3pm 3:15-5:30pm

The S and O in SOAP: Gathering the Information

Dr. Karen Felsted &
Dr. Michael Dicks

The A in SOAP: Identifying the Problem

Dr. Karen Felsted &
Dr. Michael Dicks

Keynote Luncheon:

Dr. Oliver Garden

The A in SOAP: Identifying the Problem (continued)

Dr. Karen Felsted &
Dr. Michael Dicks

The P in SOAP: Putting together the treatment

Dr. Karen Felsted &
Dr. Michael Dicks