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New Bolton Center Kennett Square, PA
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610-444-5800
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Ryan Hospital Philadelphia, PA
Emergencies:
215-746-8911
Appointments:
215-746-8387
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Gifts in Action


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Life's Not Always a Bowl of Cherries

On a sunny day in late June, Rocky the French bulldog ate some wild cherries in his backyard. What seemed like an innocuous event at the time was the start of a six-week ordeal that brought two-year-old Rocky to multiple veterinarians, each trying to find the cause of his mysterious symptoms.

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Helping Tendons Heal Faster

When Leonard Francesco's yellow Labrador Retriever, Maxine, jumped to catch a ball and landed funny on her back leg, it was clear to her primary care veterinarian what the problem was: she had injured her common calcaneal tendon, also known as the Achilles tendon.

Microbes in Alcoholic Liver Disease, Sepsis, and Periodontal Disease

Through Penn Vet’s Center for Host-Microbial Interactions, researchers are exploring the microbiome of animals in order to benefit both animal and human health. Three new studies will explore how microbes impact alcoholic liver disease, infections caused by Salmonella, and periodontal disease. These projects are funded by a generous gift from Robert and Hope Sheft.

Nero, Ryan patient

From Diagnosis to Recovery: Nero Fights Cancer

Few things are as devastating and scary for pet owners as a cancer diagnosis for their beloved pet. And that is exactly how Nancy and Gary Lewis felt when they received the news that their 13-year-old Golden Retriever/Black Labrador mix, Nero, had a soft tissue sarcoma on his right front leg.

Toby's Battle With Lymphoma

Toby, a Labradoodle, was diagnosed with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma when he was eight years old. His owner, Kim Dugan, brought him to the Comprehensive Cancer Care team at Penn Vet.

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Peter Vogel, V'90: The Power of Planned Giving

In addition to becoming a successful small animal veterinarian, Penn Vet alumnus Peter Vogel, V’90, has dedicated himself to strengthening the veterinary profession. He is particularly concerned about the significant loan debt facing many vet school graduates and sees a need to increase public awareness of the value that veterinarians offer to society.

Penn Vet donor and friend, Connie Buerger and Max

The Buergers - Supporting Potential

Several years ago, Connie Buerger brought her beloved 11-year-old Portuguese water dog, Max, to Penn Vet’s Ryan Hospital to have a group of masses growing on his left shoulder evaluated. One of the reasons Connie brought Max to Ryan Hospital was because her daughter-in-law, and Penn Vet Overseer, Krista Buerger, had shared with her the excellent care her own Portuguese water dog, Kobe, had received just a year before.

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Dr. Abram Stavitsky, V’46 - Creating a Permanent Legacy

Through the use of gift annuities and IRA rollover gifts to support scholarship at Penn Vet, Dr. Abram Stavitsky, V'46, has ensured that the School can continue to provide the highest level of scientific training for future veterinarians. He is particularly passionate about providing financial support for minority students.

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Carol Rinehart - A Love of Animals

Born in Texas, Carol Ann Rinehart loved animals all her life. She made sure they would be well taken care of in years to come by creating an endowed Opportunity Scholarship.

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Miranda Markart and Ethan Flint - Never Too Young

The generosity of donors Miranda Markart and Ethan Flint has and will continue to support clinical trials through their endowment for the Veterinary Clinical Investigations Center.

Vite Laboratory, Niemann Pick Disease

Niemann-Pick Disease: Incurable?

Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is a rare and incurable neurological disorder that affects one in 120,000 people worldwide.  Presently, there are no therapies approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat NPC.

Dr. Charles Vite, associate professor in neurology and neurosurgery in the Department of Clinical Studies at Penn Vet, is hopeful that this will soon change.

Filling the Gap: Growing Brody’s Bone

In both dogs and children, the long bones in the legs and arms grow from an area at either end of these bones called the physis, or more commonly, the growth plate. When growth plates close prematurely, the bone is unable to achieve its normal length. Surgeons at Penn Vet's Ryan Hospital came up with a unique treatment protocol to regrow the bone of a dog with this condition.