Contact
New Bolton Center Kennett Square, PA
Emergencies & Appointments:
610-444-5800
Directions
Ryan Hospital Philadelphia, PA
Emergencies:
215-746-8911
Appointments:
215-746-8387
Directions

Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center Recognizes National Day of the Horse

By Louisa Shepard Published: Dec 8, 2014

[December 8, 2014; Kennett Square, PA] – Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center recognizes the tenth anniversary of the National Day of the Horse, December 13, designated “in recognition of the importance of horses to the security, economy, recreation, and heritage of the United States.”

 The resolution, passed by the U.S. Senate in 2004, also “encourages all people of the United States to be mindful of the contribution of horses to the economy, history, and character of the United States.”

Since its founding in 1884, Penn Vet has been a major force in advancing veterinary care for horses, building a worldwide reputation for research, diagnosis, and treatment of every type of equine patient, from champion racehorses to show horses to beloved backyard ponies.

Some famous patients treated at New Bolton Center, Penn Vet’s large animal hospital, in recent years include:

Barbaro, with Dr. Dean RichardsonBarbaro: Winner of the 2006 Kentucky Derby, this Thoroughbred colt shattered his right hind leg at the Preakness Stakes. He spent eight months at New Bolton Center under the care of renowned surgeon Dr. Dean Richardson, who performed multiple surgeries to repair three bones shattered into more than 20 fragments. The leg fractures healed, but Barbaro developed laminitis, which led to his death in 2007.

Animal Kingdom: Just a few weeks after winning the 2011 Kentucky Derby and placing second in the Preakness, the chestnut colt came up lame after the Belmont Stakes. Chief of Surgery Dr. Dean Richardson inserted two screws to repair a fracture in his hock. The champion Thoroughbred went on to place second in the Breeder’s Cup, and then win the $10 million Dubai World Cup in 2013.

Paynter: After undergoing abdominal surgery by Emergency and Critical Care specialist Dr. Louise Southwood in 2012, this dark bay Thoroughbred, who made his name by winning the William Hill Haskell Invitational at Monmouth Park, continued his successful racing career. 

Neville Bardos: Trapped in a devastating barn fire, this Australian eventing Thoroughbred was treated at New Bolton Center for damage to his lungs and airway. He was named to the U.S. Olympic 3-Day Event team in the 2012 Olympic Games in London.

Hardest Core: Only nine months after emergency abdominal surgery by Dr. Louise Southwood, this bay Thoroughbred won the Arlington Million in 2014, securing a spot to run in the prestigious Breeders’ Cup Turf Classic.

New Bolton Pioneer/“Boone”: This colt was born at 9:22 p.m. on March 29, 2014, at New Bolton Center with the world watching via a Foal Cam – a live video feed on Penn Vet’s website. More than 170,000 people in more than 120 countries viewed the live broadcast from Feb. 14 to Apr. 2. The embryo was created using an advanced reproductive technique used in human medicine, intrascytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and transferred to our mare, My Special Girl.

New Bolton Center provides the highest level of care for every patient, famous or not, building on a legacy of veterinarians who were pioneers in the profession. Our veterinarians have been especially influential in the development of equine surgery:

Dr. Mark Allam: A Dean of the School, Dr. Allam introduced aseptic surgery to veterinary medicine in 1945.

Dr. Jacques Jenny: A Swiss orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Jenny defied convention in the 1950s and 1960s by attempting to repair fractures in horses’ legs, pioneering work on equine joint surgery and post-operative recovery. Jenny developed New Bolton Center’s famous “pool recovery system,” opened in 1975, which allows horses to awake safely from anesthesia after orthopedic surgery.

Dr. Charles Raker: At Penn Vet from the 1950s to 1980s, Dr. Raker, as Chief of Surgery at New Bolton Center, made significant contributions and innovations in equine surgery. Raker developed new techniques in orthopedics, and made great advances in the field of equine upper airway surgery. 

Dr. David Nunamaker: In the 1960s, Dr. Nunamaker conducted important research into many orthopedic conditions affecting race horses, contributed greatly to the understanding of the mechanics of bone modeling and remodeling in horses, and designed a widely used external fixation device for horses suffering from catastrophic leg fractures.

Dr. Eric Tulleners: An expert in upper respiratory tract conditions in horses, Dr. Tulleners pioneered laser surgery in the 1990s specifically to treat those problems.

Dr. Dean Richardson: The current Chief of Surgery at New Bolton Center continues Penn Vet’s pioneering tradition in orthopedic surgery, creating new orthopedic surgical techniques, especially regarding arthroscopic surgery.

About Penn Vet

Penn Vet is a global leader in veterinary medicine education, research, and clinical care. Founded in 1884, Penn Vet is the only veterinary school developed in association with a medical school. The school is a proud member of the One Health Initiative, linking human, animal, and environmental health.

Penn Vet serves a diverse population of animals at its two campuses, which include extensive diagnostic and research laboratories. New Bolton Center, Penn Vet’s large-animal hospital on nearly 700 acres in rural Kennett Square, PA, cares for horses and livestock/farm animals. The hospital handles more than 4,000 patient visits a year, while the Field Service treats nearly 36,000 patients at local farms. In addition, New Bolton Center’s campus includes a swine center, working dairy, and poultry unit that provide valuable research for the agriculture industry. Ryan Hospital in Philadelphia provides care for dogs, cats, and other domestic/companion animals, handling more than 31,000 patient visits a year.

For more information, visit www.vet.upenn.edu.

About Penn Vet

Ranked among the top ten veterinary schools worldwide, the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) is a global leader in veterinary education, research, and clinical care. Founded in 1884, Penn Vet is the first veterinary school developed in association with a medical school. The school is a proud member of the One Health initiative, linking human, animal, and environmental health.

Penn Vet serves a diverse population of animals at its two campuses, which include extensive diagnostic and research laboratories. Ryan Hospital in Philadelphia provides care for dogs, cats, and other domestic/companion animals, handling nearly 35,000 patient visits a year. New Bolton Center, Penn Vet’s large-animal hospital on nearly 700 acres in rural Kennett Square, PA, cares for horses and livestock/farm animals. The hospital handles nearly 4,900 patient visits a year, while the Field Service treats more than 38,000 patients at local farms. In addition, New Bolton Center’s campus includes a swine center, working dairy, and poultry unit that provide valuable research for the agriculture industry.

Media Contacts

Martin Hackett
Director of Communications and Marketing
mhackett@vet.upenn.edu
215-898-1475

John Donges
Communications Coordinator
jdonges@vet.upenn.edu
215-898-4234

Hannah Kleckner
Communications Specialist for New Bolton Center
hkleck@vet.upenn.edu
610-925-6241