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New Bolton Center Kennett Square, PA
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New Bolton Center: Patient Stories


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New Bolton Center Pigs Star in International Competition

The giant sows came up close, curious, some poking their snouts through the railings, as the eight elementary school students walked down the aisle, making their way through the enclosed barn.

Lisa Gaudio with Kyrie

A Legacy Continues

Last February, Lisa Gaudio and her husband Jim Kazanjian had to say goodbye to their beloved half-Arabian, Kyrie Eleison. The dark bay mare had fought a long battle with laminitis, spending many weeks at Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center under the care of a dedicated team that included Dr. James Orsini, Associate Professor of Surgery, and Patrick Reilly, Chief of Farrier Services.

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The Mystery of the Barrel Racer

The barrel-racer’s bone scan showed a hot spot right where the spine attaches to the base of the skull, indicating an injury. But the radiographs were inconclusive.

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Special Paint’s Eyes Saved by Laser Treatment

In the first collaboration of its kind between Penn Vet and Penn Med, clinicians used a laser treatment for humans to treat cancerous tumors in the delicate area around both eyes of a horse.

Toodles the goat

Trouble with Toodles

In what may be the first procedure of its kind, New Bolton Center ophthalmologists have performed cataract surgery on both eyes of a goat, and implanted artificial lenses, making it possible for her to see.

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Medical Mystery: Big Thoroughbred Has a Big Infection

The racetrack was not the place for this sweet Thoroughbred gelding, fighting to come in second-to-last in his best race. Flying over open hills and jumps, that’s what this athlete was clearly born to do. 

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Dr. Dean Richardson: Fixing Broken Horses

Advances in technology and experience have greatly improved orthopedic surgery techniques for equine fracture repair, said Dr. Dean W. Richardson, the Charles W. Raker Professor of Equine Surgery and Chief of Large Animal Surgery at Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center.

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Mandola the Wonder Horse

The horse resides in a new, four-stall barn where he can see the various comings and goings – equine, human, vehicular – at Ashwell Stable. Park your car up that way, and he’ll almost always hang his head over the stall door. You pretty much have to say hello and give him a pat on the neck. For him, for you, for anyone who ever hurt. That’s just the way Mandola is.

Lynne Cassimeris and Tutti

First Filly Tutti

Squeezing through a tiny gap between horses in the stretch, Tuttipaesi came in first over the wire in the $200,000 Grade II Santa Ana Stakes in Santa Anita. The impressive win was a surprise: Tutti had come back after 18 months of rest to recover from a life-threatening illness that landed her in New Bolton Center's isolation wing.

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Partner, Poster Horse for Colic Surgery

Partner had colicked before, but the gelding’s primary veterinarian could manage his symptoms. This time was different. The Kentucky Mountain Horse immediately rolled after a post-ride bath. Clearly in pain, he was sweating, pawing the ground, trying to go down, simply inconsolable.

Lexi

MRI the Key to Diagnosing Lexi's Lameness

While in their second dressage show together, Caitlin MacGuinness noticed that her new mount, Lagato, seemed to be a bit lame on the right front leg, but only when turned sharply to the right.

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Goat SOS: Navy Mascot Needs New Bolton Center

On a warm September evening, a dozen members of the U.S. Naval Academy leadership, including the Commandant of Midshipmen, were gathered on an expansive lawn, anticipating the arrival of the guests of honor. Those guests? A pair of young goats, Bill 35 and Bill 36, the new mascots for the Academy football team.

My Special Girl and colt, Penn Vet, New Bolton Center, Foal Cam

The Birth of a Foal: What We Look For and What We Do

Trying to pinpoint a mare’s foaling date is challenging because the mare’s gestation period is one of the most variable, stretching from 10 ½ to 13 months. The average gestation is about 11 months. What happens when the big day comes? And what should you be looking for?

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Giant Donkey with Laminitis Saved by Sling and Surgery

With great sadness, Susan Yates walked out of the barn and headed to the house to call the vet. It was time to put down the big donkey she had just adopted five days earlier.

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Experienced Nursing Care Key to Healing, Handling

Constant care by experienced, skilled, attentive veterinary technicians can make all the difference in how well an animal heals, especially in the most critical cases.

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Pig Injured by Hunting Arrow Saved by Surgery at Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center

Veterinarians at Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center performed emergency surgery on a 500-pound pig found at a Chester County animal sanctuary with a hunting arrow embedded in its chest.

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New Bolton Center’s New Dynamic Endoscope Key to Diagnosing Upper Airway Problems in Horses

The athletic Thoroughbred gelding might have had a slight “roar” to his breathing when event rider Lara Geiger purchased Benji four years ago; but if it was there, it was hardly noticeable.

 

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The Horse Who Jumped Over Anything

The racetrack was not the place for this sweet Thoroughbred gelding, fighting to come in second-to-last in his best race. Flying over open hills and jumps, that’s what this athlete was clearly born to do. 

 

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New Bolton’s Moran Critical Care Center Helps Prevent Spread of Contagious Diseases

The most critically ill horses at New Bolton Center are those with gastrointestinal conditions or contagious diseases. Our James M. Moran, Jr. Critical Care Center, which opened five years ago, is designed specifically for these patients.

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Diagnosing Lyme Disease in Horses is Difficult

Most horses in the Mid-Atlantic region show evidence of exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. The vast majority of those exposed horses do not develop clinical signs of disease. However, a small number of infected horses will develop disease of the nervous system, termed Lyme Neuroborreliosis.