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Lilies Lethal to Cats

Published: Mar 19, 2013

[March 19, 2013; Philadelphia, PA] – With Easter rapidly approaching, the veterinarians at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine would like to remind pet owners that Easter lilies are highly toxic to cats, with the potential for causing kidney failure. All parts of the plant are considered poisonous, so lilies should be kept away from cats at all times.Easter lilies

Lilies dangerous to cats include:

• Easter lily
• Tiger lily
• Rubrum lily
• Japanese show lily
• Day lily

A cat may vomit, lose its appetite or become lethargic within a few hours of eating a dangerous plant. If this happens, see your veterinarian immediately.

In addition, pets should not ingest onions, macadamia nuts or alcohol, as they are toxic to both dogs and cats. Pets also should never be fed chocolate, as it contains the heart stimulant theobromine, which can cause severe heart arrhythmias or seizures if ingested in large doses.

About Penn Vet

Ranked among the top ten veterinary schools worldwide, the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) is a global leader in veterinary education, research, and clinical care. Founded in 1884, Penn Vet is the first veterinary school developed in association with a medical school. The school is a proud member of the One Health initiative, linking human, animal, and environmental health.

Penn Vet serves a diverse population of animals at its two campuses, which include extensive diagnostic and research laboratories. Ryan Hospital in Philadelphia provides care for dogs, cats, and other domestic/companion animals, handling nearly 35,000 patient visits a year. New Bolton Center, Penn Vet’s large-animal hospital on nearly 700 acres in rural Kennett Square, PA, cares for horses and livestock/farm animals. The hospital handles nearly 4,900 patient visits a year, while the Field Service treats more than 38,000 patients at local farms. In addition, New Bolton Center’s campus includes a swine center, working dairy, and poultry unit that provide valuable research for the agriculture industry.

Media Contacts

Martin Hackett
Director of Communications and Marketing
mhackett@vet.upenn.edu
215-898-1475

John Donges
Communications Coordinator
jdonges@vet.upenn.edu
215-898-4234

Hannah Kleckner
Communications Specialist for New Bolton Center
hkleck@vet.upenn.edu
610-925-6241