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Cancer Center News


Department Highlights

Dr. Andres Blanco, Penn Vet M. Andrés Blanco, an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. and his colleagues have identified a new approach to triggering differentiation in AML—one with potential to treat a much wider array of AML patients. Their study, published in the journal Cancer Discovery, identifies an enzyme that regulates the process by which AML cells differentiate. In both cell lines and an animal model, the researchers found that inhibiting this enzyme, particularly in combination with other anti-cancer therapies, prompted AML cells to lose aspects of their identity associated with aggressive growth. The cells also began to exit the cell cycle, on the path toward maturing into a new cell type. Read the rest of the story...
Dr. Nicola Mason, Associate Professor of Medicine and PathobiologyFor dogs with osteosarcoma, a cancer of the bone, the standard treatment has been amputation combined with chemotherapy, and even that rarely staves off the cancer’s spread. Dr. Nicola Mason is embarking on a new way to treat the disease, using a novel immunotherapy-based vaccine to prevent metastasis to other organs. Read about Dr. Mason's clinical trial for canine cancer patients ...

Media Coverage


Penn Vet News Stories

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T cells that ‘nibble’ tumors unwittingly help cancer evade the immune response

Penn Vet have uncovered a detailed mechanism by which tumors can skirt both the immune system and cancer therapies that leverage its power.

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Changing the identity of cancer cells to eliminate them

A team led by the School of Veterinary Medicine’s M. Andrés Blanco has uncovered a new target for treating certain blood cancers that works by removing an obstacle to their maturation.

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A new role for a triple-negative breast cancer target

These changes require energy. In a study using a new, genetically altered mouse model, researchers led by Rumela Chakrabarti of Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine have uncovered a key protein involved in supplying the mammary gland with fuel during puberty. It’s a protein that her group had earlier shown to play a role in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), a particularly aggressive form of the disease

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Penn Vet Opens the First Academic Extracellular Vesicle Core Facility in the United States, Supports Investigators in the Growing Field of Extracellular Research

[PHILADELPHIA, September 12, 2019] - A new core facility, the first on the east coast to exclusively focus on the isolation and characterization of extracellular vesicles, has opened at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet). The Extracellular Vesicle Core Facility at Penn Vet supports investigators with the necessary scientific and technical capabilities to define, standardize and monitor research in pathological and physiological conditions.