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Wildlife Futures in the News Media


Wildlife Futures Stories

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The search for the culprit behind songbird deaths

Across the United States, songbirds are dying from a mysterious condition. Working with long-established partners, Penn Vet researchers are striving for a diagnosis.

Robin - photograph courtesy of Jack Kemp

MEDIA ALERT - 70 Reports of Mysterious Songbird Deaths in Philadelphia Region, Across State

Wildlife Futures Program experts at Penn Vet and officials from the Pennsylvania Game Commission are investigating more than 70 general public reports of songbirds that are sick or dying dying due to an emerging health condition with an unknown cause.

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Forward-Thinking Wildlife Futures Program Recognized

The Northeast Wildlife Administrators Association of the Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies in April honored the Pennsylvania Game Commission for the agency’s forward-thinking in establishing its Wildlife Futures Program.

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From animals to people and back again

Last month, it was gorillas. Before that, it was mink. And earlier still, tigers and lions. All of these species have been confirmed to have had a diagnosis of COVID-19, infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

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Bats and COVID

COVID-19 is a zoonotic disease. For the 200+ bats currently in wildlife rehabilitation facilities across Pennsylvania, this presents a threat. Eman Anis, a microbiologist with Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center, is leading a study to test for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in North American bats, work being done with associate professors Lisa Murphy and Julie Ellis and Pennsylvania Game Commission biologist Greg Turner. 

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Taking on wildlife disease

When wildlife biologist Matthew Schnupp began his career, the emphasis was on conserving habitat. “The paradigm of wildlife management for the last 20 years has been habitat management,” he says, aiming to conserve the land and ecosystems animals require to thrive.

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The importance of wild animal health

PennVet and the Pennsylvania Game Commission (PGC) recently initiated the Pennsylvania Wildlife Futures Program  (WFP), a new science-based, wildlife health program that will increase disease surveillance, management and innovative research aimed at better protecting wildlife across the Commonwealth. 

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Game Commission and Penn Vet Partner to Protect Wildlife

White-nose syndrome has killed 99 percent of most cave-bat species.

Chronic wasting disease continues to spread to new parts of Pennsylvania, infecting and killing deer and threatening hunting tradition.

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Pennsylvania Game Commission and Penn Vet form the Wildlife Futures Program

In August 2019, Penn Vet and the Game Commission announced the Pennsylvania Wildlife Futures Program, a new science-based, wildlife health program that will increase disease surveillance, management and research to better protect wildlife across the Commonwealth.