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Radiology/Diagnostic Imaging

CT feline kidneysVeterinary Radiology at Penn Vet combines trailblazing research, outstanding education and clinical excellence in a leading academic health sciences institution.

Our clinicians, all board-certified in Radiology, provide the clinical imaging and radiation therapy needed for patients of Ryan Veterinary Hospital for small companion animals in the greater Philadelphia region.

At Ryan Veterinary Hospital, the diagnostic imaging capabilities include digital radiography, fluoroscopy, ultrasonography, 16-slice helical computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 

Penn Vet’s Ryan Veterinary Hospital, one of the busiest veterinary teaching hospitals in the country, sees more than 31,000 small-animal patient visits a year. The Radiology Section benefits directly from this caseload, with 16,000 small-animal imaging studies and 6,500 large-animal imaging studies per year. Because Ryan is a tertiary referral facility, hospital clients expect the best possible veterinary care for their pets.

The MRI Referral Center opened in 2007 and now receives cases referred by practicing veterinarians. A fully-staffed MRI facility, the Rosenthal Imaging and Treatment Center (RITC),Penn Vet Radiology, bullet in dog thorax provides comprehensive referral service in a friendly and efficient manner for our clients and their companion animals.

Outpatient imaging is provided for Ultrasound, Computed Tomography, and MRI. These imaging services are provided with a referral from a veterinarian and a scheduled appointment. Please expect a half-day visit for that appointment.

Are you a referring veterinarian?

If you are referring a patient to Ryan Hospital...

State-of-the-art: RITC

The Rosenthal Imaging & Treatment Center (RITC)  houses medical imaging and radiation therapy equipment.

Learn more about RITC...


  • Take a look inside Atlas 2.0
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 3 - Necklymp, pages 55-56.

  • [VIDEO] Pyelonephritis in a cat
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    This is the answer to our recent quiz Time to play! [3]. Thank you all for participating :-) From the video collection of Chapter 10 – Kidney and Ureters. Click HD on top right of viewer for optimized resolution once the video is started. Read the rest of our Blog for more cases Go back to the [ 1 more word. ]

  • Cysterna chyli in a 10 year old dog
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 15 - Abdominal Cavity, Lymph Nodes, and Great Vessels Figure 15.3 Cysterna chyli in a 10 year old Labrador dog with gastroenteritis. There was no peritoneal effusion or other signs of lymphatic congestion. The cysterna (arrowheads) appears as a well-defined cystic structure partly encircling the mid abdominal aorta on its dorsal left border. It appears fusiform in longitudinal plane (A) and oval to semicircular in transverse plane (B). [ 8 more words. ]
  • A rarely documented condition is described in this study in collaboration with our colleagues at UCDavis and NCSU.


    CT AND MRI FEATURES OF CAROTID BODY PARAGANGLIOMAS IN 16 DOGS
    www.readcube.com
    Carotid body tumors (paragangliomas) arise from chemoreceptors located at the carotid bifurcation. In imaging studies, this neoplasm may be confused with other neck neoplasms such as thyroid carcinoma. The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to describe computed tomographic (CT)…
  • Congratulation to our 3rd year resident Dr Jonathan Nevins on the publication of this paper in early view in Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound!!! GOOD JOB, Dr Nevins!!! - with Jenn Adolf Reetz Ana Vanessa Caceres Jantra Ngosuwan Suran Naomi Ford Adam Yoskowitz Shoko Fukuda Pascal Fontaine


    ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN ULTRASOUND AND CLINICAL FINDINGS IN 87 CATS WITH URETHRAL OBSTRUCTION
    www.readcube.com
    Urethral obstruction is a life-threatening form of feline lower urinary tract disease. Ultrasonographic risk factors for reobstruction have not been previously reported. Purposes of this retrospective cross-sectional study were to describe urinary tract ultrasound findings in cats following acute ur…

  • Take a look inside Atlas 2.0
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 18 - Spine & Nerves, page 556

  • Transitional cell carcinoma and regional lymphadenopathy in a male neutered dog
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 14 - Male Reproductive Tract Figure 14.20. Transitional cell carcinoma and regional lymphadenopathy in an old, neutered dog with hematuria and dysuria. Sagittal (A) and transverse (B) images of the bladder neck and prostate. Strongly shadowing hyperechoic foci are in the prostate, and a soft-tissue projection is in the bladder lumen (arrow). Sagittal images of right medial iliac… [ 55 more words. ]

  • [VIDEO] Polycystic kidney disease (PKD)

    From the video collection of Chapter 10 – Kidneys and Ureters. Click HD on top right of the viewer for optimized resolution once the video is started.

  • Left parasternal short-axis scanning technique
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 5 - Heart Figure 5.6. Left parasternal short-axis scanning technique. The transducer is positioned near the left cranial border of the heart. Cranial-caudal yields the series of short axis (SAx) images. Variable angulation in the dorsal-ventral direction may be necessary as suggested by the figure. 1: Left parasternal short-axis (LPS SAx) view at the right ventricle (RV) inflow tract. [ 94 more words. ]

  • Normal anterior segment of the eye
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 2 - Eye and Orbit Figure 2.8. Normal anterior segment of the eye A: Schematic drawing of the anterior segment of the eye. C, cornea; AC, anterior chamber; I, iris; PC, posterior chamber; L, lens; VB, vitreous body; CB, ciliary body. B: High-resolution (12 MHz) sonogram of the cornea, anterior and posterior chambers, ciliary bodies (CB). The cornea appears as 2 discrete hyperechoic curvilinear interfaces (arrowheads). [ 89 more words. ]

  • Adrenal nodules and masses in four dogs
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 12 - Adrenals Figure 12.10. Adrenal nodules and masses in four dogs. A: Sagittal sonogram of the left adrenal gland of a Toy Poodle with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Note the hyperechoic nodules in each pole of the gland, which is thickened (up to 10.4mm). B: Sagittal sonogram of the left adrenal gland of a Mountain Bernese dog with histiocytic sarcoma. [ 125 more words. ]

  • [VIDEO] Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    From the video collection of Chapter 5 - Heart. Click HD on top right of viewer for optimized resolution.

  • Carcinomatosis and sarcomatosis
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 15 - Abdominal Cavity, Lymph Nodes, and Great Vessels Figure 15.17. Carcinomatosis and sarcomatosis. A and B: In these two cats with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, nodules of variable echogenicity are disseminated in the omentum and mesentery. C: In one of these cats (same as in A), hypoechoic nodules also invade the peritoneal lining and adjacent abdominal wall. [ 27 more words. ]

  • Take a look inside Atlas 2.0
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 16 - Clinical Applications of Contrast Ultrasound, pages 481-482.

  • [VIDEO] Chronic interstitiel nephritis in cats

    From the video collection of Chapter 10 – Kidneys & Ureters. Click HD on top right of viewer for optimized resolution.

  • Time to play! [2]

    In this dog ultrasounded for a splenic mass palpated during the annual physical exam, something weird was noted in the cranial abdomen... What is it?! Play with us and leave your thoughts on our Fa...

  • Primary flexor enthesopathy in a Golden retriever
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 17 - Musculoskeletal System Figure 17.26. Primary flexor enthesopathy. Medial (A) and dorsal (B) views of the elbow of a 14 month-old Golden retriever dog produced with computed tomographic (CT) volume-rendering, with the overlying transverse and longitudinal planes used to produce the sonographc images on the right (respectively). Large (M) and small (m) mineral fragments are depicted in all images. [ 48 more words. ]

  • Timeline Photos
    Feline gallbladder, be my valentine! http://wp.me/p52VLQ-a1

  • Ultrasound-guided freehand biopsy of a retro-orbital mass
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 2 - Eye and Orbit Figure 2.49. Ultrasound-guided freehand biopsy of a retro-orbital mass. A: CT image of the large and poorly enhancing retrobulbar mass (arrows). The eye (E) is markedly displaced dorsally and deformed. B: The 18 Gauge core needle placed in an automated biopsy gun, is engaged into the retrobulbar lesion that was diagnosed an orbital schwannoma on histopathological evaluation. [ 9 more words. ]

  • Quel est votre diagnostic - Veterinarius +
    animages.ca
    Notre collègue radiologiste et ami Hugo Joly du Centre vétérinaire DMV présente un cas de radiographies de la colonne cervicale d'un jeune caniche dans le dernier encart du Veterinarius +. Je vous invite à consulter tous les détails de ce cas ici. [ 1 more word. ]

  • And the answer is...
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    To review the post with the question, click here On endoscopy, 2 pieces of carrots were seen in the stomach. Carrots have this stunning pattern on ultrasound! Something to remember as it can mimic intussusception, or foreign material...but it is food!

  • Take a look inside Atlas 2.0
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 1 - Practical Physical Concepts & Artifacts, page 56.

  • Time to play!
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    A young dog was referred for evaluation of a suspected portosystemic shunt. This image was obtained at the level of the funds of the stomach...What is it? The answer will appear on Monday :) [ 1 more word. ]

  • [VIDEO] Inflammatory bowel disease in a cat

    From the video collection of Chapter 8 - Gastrointestinal Tract. Click HD on top right of viewer for optimised resolution.

  • Sciatic nerve sheath fibrosarcoma in a dog
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 18 - Spine and Nerves Figure 18.24. Sciatic nerve sheath fibrosarcoma in a dog. A: Transverse sonographic image of a 2.15cm thick hypoechoic mass located dorsal to the acetabular bone (Ac) and femoral head (FH). B: Transverse post-contrast T1-weighted MR sequence with fat saturation, highlighting the contrast-enhancing mass (arrowheads). The adjacent muscles are atrophied and hyperintense. T, tail; P, pubis. [ 7 more words. ]

  • [VIDEO] Image Formation and other principles

    From the video collection of Chapter 1 - Practical Physics and Artifacts, here is the first tutorial on the basics of ultrasound image formation and other physical principles that influence image quality. Got get your popcorn and select 720pHD under parameters (once the clip starts) for an optimised experience. :-)

  • Echogenic peritoneal effusions in dogs and cats
    smallanimalultrasonography.com
    From Chapter 15 - Abdominal Cavity, Lymph Nodes, and Great Vessels Figure 15.6. Echogenic peritoneal effusions in dogs and cats. A: Longitudinal image of a dog with abdominal distension and pain. A large volume of particulate, echogenic, peritoneal effusion (*) is seen around the spleen (Sp). These features are suggestive of a cellular effusion, such as exudate or hemorrhage. [ 97 more words. ]
  • Penn Vet's Dr. Phillip Scott is developing new treatments for the neglected tropical disease Leishmaniasis: http://t.co/Ia8aJc7AQU
  • OC Raw Dog Recalls Turkey & Produce Raw Frozen Canine Formulation Because of Possible Salmonella Health Risk: http://t.co/Fr90zFSoRI
  • Nominate that special veterinarian in your pet's life for America's Favorite Veterinarian! http://t.co/dmvTaRAYL7
  • Penn Vet's Shelter Animal Medicine program partners with Humane Society Pets for Life program to help Philadelphians http://t.co/zv8vRj4i39
  • Dr. Mary Bryant has been named Penn Vet's new Executive Director of the Office of Students. Welcome, Dr. Bryant! http://t.co/nUZ5hWNKth


Radiology

  • Description of Service and Procedures

    Penn Vet Radiology, Tibial tuberosity avulsionDiagnostic radiology provides survey and special procedure services only for Ryan Veterinary Hospital patients. Routine thoracic, abdominal and skeletal radiographs, special procedures (e.g., myelography) and special contrast procedures (e.g., excretory urograms, barium contrast studies) are provided.

    Estimated Time for Completion of Service

    Typical time to completion from the time of a submitted request for a radiographic examination is between two and three hours depending on caseload.

    Procedures

    • Most standard radiographs are obtained by highly trained and skilled veterinary radiology technologists. They ensure that the procedure is performed as smoothly and fast as possible, while guaranteeing excellent image quality, thereby allowing maximal diagnostic accuracy.
    • Images are reviewed within minutes by board-certified radiologists.
    • Penn Vet, MRI hydrocephalusSpecial procedures (contrast studies, fluoroscopy) are performed under the supervision of a radiologist.
    • Some procedures will require anesthesia: most orthopedic radiographs, most contrast studies will need to be obtained with the patient absolutely still, which will require sedation or anesthesia.
    • The duration of anesthesia is generally short, and the patient is monitored using sophisticated equipment including electrocardiogram, blood pressure and respiratory indices. Modern anesthesia drugs allow for quick onset of and recovery from anesthesia. Under direct supervision by a board-certified anesthesiologist, anesthesia is administered by highly trained veterinary nurse-anesthetists who select the drugs and administration protocol according to each patient’s individual requirements.

    Appointment / Referral Information

    CT/MRI/Ultrasound outpatient services are now available.

Ultrasound

  • Description of Service and Procedures

    The ultrasound imaging service provides abdominal, non-cardiac thoracic, musculoskeletal and ocular ultrasound; US-guUltrasound: intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, Penn Vetided aspiration and biopsy procedures.

    Estimated Time for Completion of Service

    Typical time to completion of a radiographic or ultrasonographic examination is between two and four hours depending on caseload.

    Procedures

    • All our ultrasound examinations are performed by radiologists. None is performed by a technologist.
    • Abdominal hair will need to be clipped to allow for adequate penetration of ultrasound into the patient.
    • Ultrasound examinations have to be performed on fasted animals so you should not feed your pet before bringing him to the hospital otherwise this will decrease the quality and diagnostic value of the examination.Penn Vet, Ryan Hospital, radiology
    • The examination itself lasts approximately 30 minutes after which a report is quickly generated and made available to the primary doctor.
    • Occasionally, sedation or anesthesia will be needed if the animal is nervous. Sedation or anesthesia will always be needed for ultrasound guided biopsies and most fine needle aspirates, but not necessary for ultrasound guided cystocentesis and some fine needle aspirates.
    • The duration of anesthesia is generally short, and the patient is monitored using sophisticated equipment including electrocardiogram, blood pressure and respiratory indices. Modern anesthesia drugs allow for quick onset of and recovery from anesthesia. Under direct supervision by a board-certified anesthesiologist, anesthesia is administered by highly trained veterinary nurse-anesthetists who select the drugs and administration protocol according to each patient’s individual requirements.

    Appointment / Referral information

    Outpatient ultrasound imaging is now available with a referral from your local primary care veterinarian.

  • Radiology lab, Ryan HospitalDownload Imaging Request Form (pdf)
  •  

    For more information, contact Cheryl Diehl 215-746-8674

Computed Tomography (CT)

  • Description of Service and Procedures

    CT masticatory muscle myositis, Penn VetThe computed tomography service currently provides CT examinations of skull, spine, thoracic, abdominal and musculoskeletal systems, and CT angiography. CT guided biopsies are offered only to in-patients.

    A 16-slice helical CT unit was installed in 2009 and is housed in the Rosenthal Imaging and Treatment Center (RITC). This CT scanner allows for rapid acquisition of cross-sectional images. This significantly decreases the time to complete a scan and therefore duration of anesthesia and also provides images with superb resolution. In conjunction with the latest computer software multi-slice CT permits evaluation of blood flow within the body and dynamic assessment tumor perfusion.

    Procedure

    Veterinary patients must be anesthetized for CT, since they must remain absolutely still during Penn Vet, Ryan Hospital, radiology, catscanthe treatment. The duration of anesthesia is generally short (30 minutes to one hour), and the patient is monitored using sophisticated equipment including electrocardiogram, blood pressure and respiratory indices. Modern anesthesia drugs allow for quick onset of and recovery from anesthesia. Under direct supervision by a board-certified anesthesiologist, anesthesia is administered by highly trained veterinary nurse-anesthetists who select the drugs and administration protocol according to each patient’s individual requirements. Most cases require injection of iodinated contrast agents.

    Appointment / Referral information

    Outpatient CT imaging is now available with a referral from your local primary care veterinarian.

  • Radiology lab, Ryan HospitalDownload Imaging Request Form (pdf)
  • For more information, contact Cheryl Diehl at 215-746-8674

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

  • The MRI Referral Center is now open to receive cases referred by practicing veterinarians. MRI trigeminal neoplasia, Penn VetA fully staffed MRI facility, the Rosenthal Imaging and Treatment Center (RITC), provides comprehensive referral service in a friendly and efficient manner for your clients and their companion animals. Because of our location at one of the leading veterinary schools in the country, you can count on your patients receiving the most advanced veterinary diagnostic information available.

    Scheduling an MRI

    To schedule an MRI for your client at the RITC, we will need the following items:

  • Radiology lab, Ryan HospitalDownload Imaging Request Form (pdf)
  • Once we have the necessary information, your client should contact the RITC directly to make an appointment by calling 215-746-0516.

    On the day of the MRI scan, your client will leave with a copy of the MRI on a CR-ROM with a DICOM viewer. You will receive a written MRI report within 24 hours by fax or e-mail, whichever you prefer.

    We look forward to providing your client and you with the highest level of service. The RITC staff is committed to delivering a positive experience from start to finish.

  • Description of Service and Procedures

    Penn Vet, Ryan Hospital, radiologyMR imaging is used primarily for evaluation of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). Other regions of the body can be evaluated if clinically indicated. MRI provides high resolution, high contrast images. It is sensitive for detecting soft tissue pathology that may not be detectable by plain films or CT imaging.

    A GE 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner allows superb imaging of internal structures and provides soft tissue detail not available with conventional X-rays or CT scans.  MRI data is acquired by a certified MRI radiology technologist with training in both the human and veterinary fields. MRI images are interpreted by board-certified specialists in radiology and neurology.

    Pre-anesthesia evaluation is performed by a board-certified anesthesiologist who works in conjunction with the client and referring veterinarian to provide optimal patient care. The anesthesiologist will select the drugs and administration protocol according to each patient’s individual requirements. The ECG, blood pressure and respiratory indices are continuously monitored during the imaging session.

  • At least one veterinarian, numerous certified veterinary anesthesia technicians and a MRI technologist are always on site to provide care. Vital signs of every patient are monitored with the aid of specialized equipment throughout each procedure. A centralized preparation and recovery area allows for efficient and constant observation during anesthesia and recovery.

    Results are conveyed promptly to the referring veterinarian via a faxed report. The RITC is committed to providing the highest level of service to patients, clients and referring veterinarians. Our goal is to deliver a smooth, positive experience from the time your client enters our facility to the time you have your results.

The Section of Radiology members include two full-time faculty, three staff-veterinarians, five residents, one administrative assistant, one MRI technologist and five technologists. Members of the section are actively engaged in clinical, teaching and research endeavors. The section also supports an accredited three-year radiology residency program that fulfills the training guidelines of the American College of Veterinary Radiology and European College of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging. Our residency program is among the very best in the country, attracting the best and brightest veterinary post-graduates in the United States and around the world. Some have pursued academic careers and now contribute to excellence in veterinary diagnostic imaging and development of new knowledge in this field. We are emphasizing research experiences and training during the residency.

Faculty/Clinicians

 
Name
Title
Wilfried Mai, Penn Vet, Radiology Wilfried Mai, Dr Méd Vét, PhD, MSc, DECVDI, DACVR

Associate Professor of Radiology
Chief, Section of Radiology
Jantra Suran, Penn Vet, RadiologyJantra Suran, DVM, DACVR 
 Assistant Professor, Radiology
 Penn Vet, radiology, Dr. Ana Caceres Ana Caceres, DVM, DACVR
Staff Veterinarian, Radiology
 Penn Vet, radiology, Dr. Yael Mosenco Yael Porat-Mosenco, DVM, DECVDI, DACVR
Staff Veterinarian, Radiology
Jennifer Reetz, Penn Vet, Radiology Jennifer Reetz, DVM, DACVIM, DACVR
Staff Veterinarian, Radiology
Lillian Duda, VMD, Penn Vet, Radiation Oncology Lillian E. Duda, VMD, DACVR, (RO)
Radiation Therapy, Adjunct Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology
Staff


Name
Title
 
Cheryl A. Diehl
Manager, Imaging Services
 
Russell White, RT (R) (MR)
MRI Technologist
 
Amy Dilling CVT, RT, (R),(CT)
Technician
 
My Inderelst
Technician
 
Barbara Kaminsky
RT, Chief Technologist
 
Lisa Chant
Technician
 
Ella Chasan
Technician

Radiographic Suites

  • General Diagnostic Rooms

    Multi-purpose general diagnostic radiology room

    • DR Panels (Eklin EDR6 14’’x17’’. 5.9 MP array with 160 micron pitch. 12 bits grayscale. DICOM 3.0 compatible. Advanced multi-frequency image post-processing algorithms), movable to allow horizontal cross-table acquisitions.
    • General Electric MPH 65 (65 kW, 800 mA, 150 kVp) high frequency multi-pulse generator with automatic exposure control; Maxiray 100 double focus (0.6/1.25 mm) x-ray tube; Compax 40E heavy duty, elevating, four-way float radiographic table.

Special Procedures Rooms

  • General Electric Premium Legacy with Enhanced DRS

    • GE Advantx high frequency, multi-pulse 65 kW generator;
    • Advantx Legacy 90/15 (88 degrees to 15 degrees Trendelenberg) radiographic and fluoroscopic table, motorized 8-way tabletop; oscillating table Bucky with 12:1, 36 lines/cm (90 lines/inch) grid;
    • Maxiray 100 fluoroscopic x-ray tube (under table), 0.6/1.0 mm double focal spot; Maxiray 100 overhead x-ray tube, 0.6/1.25 mm double focal spot;
    • Advantx 9 inch image intensifier, 9/6/4.5 inch triple field image tube, motorized 10:1, 60 line/cm (152 lines/inch) grid, Primicon B camera, spot film device (2 images/second);
    • Advantx Digital Radiology System (DRS) Productivity Enhancement Package with real-time and post-processing edge enhancement, contrast/brightness adjustments, last hold image, digital acquisition up to 6 frames/sec, 1200 image storage.

    Fluoroscopy and Digital Radiography

    • Fixed Digital Radiography panel (Eklin EDR6 14’’x17’’. 5.9 MP array with 160 micron pitch. 12 bits grayscale. DICOM 3.0 compatible. Advanced multi-frequency image post-processing algorithms).
    • General Electric Premium Legacy with Advanced DRS:
      • GE Advantx high frequency, multi-pulse 65 kW generator;
      • Advantx Legacy 90/15 (88 degress to 15 degrees Trendelenberg) radiographic and fluoroscopic table, motorized 8-way tabletop;
      • Oscillating table Bucky with 12:1, 36 lines/cm (90 lines/inch) grid;
      • Maxiray 100 fluoroscopic x-ray tube (under table), 0.6/1.0 mm double focal spot; Maxiray 100 overhead x-ray tube, 0.6/1.25 mm double focal spot;
      • Advantx 12 inche image intensifier, 12/9/6/4.5 inch four field image tube, motorized 10:1, 60 line/cm (152 line/inch) grid, Primicon B camera;
      • Advantx Digital Radiology System (DRS) v3.2 Productivity Enhancement Package, DRS 3.2 Angiographic and Interventional Package with 800 image storage, superimposed road-mapping with peak opacification, real-time digital subtraction.

Computed Tomography Suite

    • General Electric BrightSpeed 16-slice CT:
      • Table/Gantry - advanced slip-ring technology
      • 3.5 MHU tube, 42kW generator
      • 4 Helical Modes of Data Output
        • 16x0.625mm or 1.25mm
        • 8x1.25mm or 2.5mm
        • Prospective Multiple Thickness Reconstruction
        • 0.8-1.0  second scan time
        • Horizontal range 162 cm, table load capacity 205 kg
        • DICOM 3.0 Storage Service Class
        • GE-Nemoto power injector
    • General Electric AW VolumeShare2 workstation with 2 flat panel color monitors:
      • Basic viewing/reformatting functions
      • 3D protocols including 3D MIP, Multi-planar reformat, Volume rendering CTA, General Volume Rendering, AutoBone Xpress
      • Additional software package for vascular / perfusion analysis
        • VesselIQ XPress
        • CT Perfusion 4 Multi-Organ Package

Ultrasound Suite

    • Two – General Electric Logiq 9 Ultrasound machines which features the latest advances in Ultrasound Imaging: spectral, color flow and power Doppler capability, harmonic imaging, 3D and contrast applications. M12L, M8C, 8C, 3.5C transducers.
    • One – General Electric LogicBook in the Emergency Service
    • One - Philips 7500 Sonos in Cardiology
    • One – Philips 5500 Sonos in Cardiology

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  • A 1.5 Tesla GE MRI unit is available at the RITC (Scantool 9.1 software and dedicated workstation).

Viewing Stations

    • In Radiology: Reading room
      • Four viewing stations on separate wide desks, each of them has one navigating monitor and two Medical Grade High-Resolution 3 MegaPixels 21.3’’ monitors (Nio 3MP-2H BarcoMed).
      • Two additional viewing stations next to radiology suites for immediate viewing and evaluation. Stations are connected to a PACS system (Philips Stentor PACS system). Ordering, reporting and billing are made through a Radiology Information System (Empiric Systems).

    Wide screen monitor viewing stations are installed throughout the hospital including ORs, wards, ICU, ES and consult rooms.

FAQs for Pet Owners

Q: What is Radiology?

  • A: The branch of medicine known as radiology was born when German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen accidentally discovered x-rays while working in his lab in 1895. The x-ray's extraordinary benefit to medical science was immediately recognized and, with the research of French scientists Marie and Pierre Curie that followed Roentgen's discovery, scientific and technological advances have led to the important role radiology plays today in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.
    Radiology is both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool. Diagnostic imaging employs a number of different modalities, such as plain radiography, CT scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine, to identify disease and other conditions within the patient’s body. Therapeutic imaging, commonly called interventional radiology, is a subspecialty that involves the use of imaging technology to carry out minimally invasive procedures with the help of devices such as catheters, balloons, and stents to open blocked blood vessels, drain fluid, and perform needle biopsies.
    With the exception of ultrasound, imaging studies are typically performed by a trained technologist, while the veterinary radiologist, a specially trained veterinary doctor, reviews and interprets the radiographic images and reports the findings to the patient's primary doctor. Typically these reports are finalized within 2 to 12 hours after image acquisition.
    Today, the radiologic sciences are on the brink of a new age. Digital imaging and computerized data has enabled the effective and efficient delivery of diagnosis and treatment thereby improving patient care. The section of radiology at the veterinary school of the University of Pennsylvania is at the helm of these exciting advances in imaging technology. The work being done in our section of radiology will continue to benefit healthcare to our patients and around the world.

Q: What is a Veterinary Radiologist?

  • A: An ACVR Diplomate is also known as a Board Certified Veterinary Radiologist. At least 3 years of advanced training in an American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR) Accredited Radiology Residency Program is required to take the ACVR Radiology Board Certification Examination. Many Radiology Residency Programs are 4 years. All of our radiologists are board certified and experienced in all the imaging modalities available to your pets, including digital radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography and MRI.
    View more information

Q: Will I get a report and the images obtained on my animal?

  • A: Once the imaging study is completed, they will be reviewed by a radiologist within hours and a report generated. We can burn a CD with the digital images and send them over to your referring veterinarian. Images are stored on a remote server perfectly secured so that they will always be accessible within seconds when you bring your pet to our hospital again.

Q: Will my animal be sedated or anesthetized?

  • A: Many times sedation or general anesthesia will be necessary for imaging, because most techniques require your pet to be completely still for a few seconds / minutes. If such is the case, your primary doctor will contact you to request your authorization and the procedure will be performed under the supervision of experienced and trained anesthesia nurses and doctors.

Q: Will my pet have his hair clipped?

  • A: If your animal needs an ultrasound, the hair will have to be clipped because it would prevent good imaging and thereby prevents an accurate diagnosis to be made.

Q: What is a radiographic dye?

  • A: A dye is a chemical substance that is used to increase visibility of structures in particular vessels and tumors. If your animal requires injection of a radiographic dye (required most of the times during a CT or MRI, and sometimes for some radiographic procedures), the contrast dyes with the best safety profile will be used and your pet will be closely monitored.

Q: What kind of machine do you use and who will perform the study?

  • A: Our technologists and radiologists have extensive training and experience in veterinary diagnostic imaging.
    We use machines very similar to the ones used by your own doctor, but we adjusted doses and protocols to veterinary patients. We provide images services with a quality similar to what is provided in human medicine.

Q: I am bringing my pet for an out-patient imaging procedure, what should I expect?

  • A: The Rosenthal Imaging and Treatment Center offers outpatient ultrasound, CT, MRI services. You must be referred by your veterinarian for an appointment to be scheduled (see specific sections about ultrasound, CT and MRI services). On the day of the appointment, you will meet with a radiology technologist (ultrasound) or an anesthesia nurse (CT or MRI) and your pet will be directed to the appropriate service.
    • For ultrasound, the hair will be clipped on the belly, and the examination will be performed promptly by a board-certified radiologist. A report will be generated right after the scan and provided to you as well as a CD with the images obtained during the scan. If the clinical schedule allows it, the radiologist will come meet you and go over the findings.

    For CT and MRI your pet will be brought into the RITC facilities where highly trained veterinary anesthesia nurses and doctors will handle the anesthesia during the CT or MRI procedure. The images will be interpreted by a board-certified radiologist and the report faxed over to your veterinarian within a couple hours. When your pet has recovered from anesthesia you will be able to take him home. You should plan to have the entire day available to drop off your pet and pick him up. A CD with the images will be provided to your veterinarian.