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research-news

Research News, Events & Conferences


Throughout the year, Penn Vet hosts seminars, conferences, symposiums, and speaker series, which serve as forums for academics to share the latest research approaches breakthroughs in a wide array of subjects.

Penn Vet Seminar Programs
The Mari Lowe Center for Comparative Onocology Seminar Series
Global Parasitology Seminars
(formerly known as the Parasitology Seminar Series)

Pathobiology Department Seminar Series

Latest Research News

Read the Penn Vet Research Newsletter to get the latest news about our faculty researchers, programs, projects, grants, and publications... Better yet, sign up to receive the latest Research Newsletter by email. 


Penn Vet Research in the News


Research Events


Penn Vet Stories About Our Research

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Blocking viruses’ exit strategy

The Marburg virus, a relative of the Ebola virus, causes a serious, often-fatal hemorrhagic fever. Transmitted by the African fruit bat and by direct human-to-human contact, Marburg virus disease currently has no approved vaccine or antivirals to prevent or treat it.

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Leaky blood-brain barrier and schizophrenia

The blood-brain barrier keeps out anything that could lead to disease and dangerous inflammation—at least when all is functioning normally.

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With impressive accuracy, dogs can sniff out coronavirus

Many long for a return to a post-pandemic “normal,” which, for some, may entail concerts, travel, and large gatherings. But how to keep safe amid these potential public health risks?

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Turning back the clock on a severe vision disorder

Gustavo Aguirre and William Beltran, veterinary ophthalmologists and vision scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, have studied a wide range of different retinal blinding disorders. But the one caused by mutations in the NPHP5 gene, leading to a form of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), is one of the most severe.