• Preclinical Service Core - Comparative Orthopedic Research Laboratory

    CORL surgery, Penn Vet

    In the current medtech landscape, investors, and ultimately payers (insurance companies, hospitals and patients), require medical innovation that provides value – reducing health care costs through better clinical outcomes and/or reduced procedure costs. This means product development decisions need to be thoughtful of 1) the overall cost for developing a product and its ultimate release, as well as, 2) the value it brings.

    Appropriately aligning your product development efforts, including your preclinical testing, can make your team more efficient and ultimately increase the likelihood of a successful product. For over a decade, we have taken time to listen to you and to understand the product development plan, intended market, and the value proposition for your investigational therapy or device. Our objective is to ask the right questions in order to choose a refined preclinical model with high translational fidelity. This approach has delivered answers in the context of the intended clinical indication of your technology. Together, we have successfully moved numerous new therapies to market; and we have failed, but failing at the preclinical stage is a whole lot better than later in clinical trials.

    The Preclinical Service Core at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) is focused on non-clinical and clinical (VICH-GL9) translation. Leveraging the multi-disciplinary specialties at Penn Vet, PRS & CORL provide a refined platform of successful translation using experimental and naturally-occurring disease models. We partner with pharmaceutical and medical-device companies, government agencies, and academic institutions to meet a broad range of R&D needs.

    Specialties: Preclinical study design and execution from proof-of-concept to pivotal trials compliant with the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) Regulations, 21 CFR Part 58 and VICH-GL9. Bioskills training and prototype testing.

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  • Avadhani Laboratory
    The research in Dr. Avadhani's laboratory is focused on the following aspects of mitochondrial genetics and regulation of mitochondrial membrane biogenesis in mammalian cells:

    1. Mechanisms of dual targeting of cytochrome P450 and related proteins to ER and mitochondria and mechanisms of activation of the chimeric N-terminal signal by cAMP and other physiological factors. 

    2. Characterization of a novel mitochondria-to-nucleus stress signaling in cells subjected to mitochondrial specific genetic, and or, metabolic stress, which operates through altered [Ca2+]c, and the role of mitochondrial stress signaling in tumor progression and metastasis.

    3. Regulation of cytochrome oxidase gene expression, and modulation of enzyme assembly/activity under chemical and oxidative stress conditions. 

    4. Role of mitochondrial stress signaling in Embryonic Stem Cell function/differentiation, and mammalian mitochondrial transcription under chemical and oxidative stress in ES cells.
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  • Reference Andrology Laboratory

    The Reference Andrology Laboratory provides complete testing of neat, cooled and frozen-thawed semen from mammalian and avian species. The primary purpose of these services is to aid practitioners in their differential diagnosis of individual/herd/flock reproductive problems.

    These services are also frequently used by practitioners and studs as a third-party quality control component in an ongoing stud auditing process.

    The laboratory strives to perform objective, validated techniques for assessing samples for the basic spermiogram parameters of sample volume, motility, morphology, and concentration. With advanced notification, we will also try to accommodate requests for supplemental assessment techniques on sperm subcellular structures. We also offer semen extender analysis and microbiological testing of the extended semen product and purified water used in extenders.

     
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  • Vite Laboratory

    The focus of the Vite lab is to improve the characterization and treatment of neurological Niemann-Pick Disease, Penn Vet, Vite Laboratorydiseases by studying naturally-occurring feline and canine models of human diseases.

    Our lab develops and identifies ante-mortem biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance markers of disease severity and progression and uses these markers to evaluate the efficacy of gene therapy, cell-based therapy, and pharmacotherapy to treat disease. 

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  • Scott Laboratory

    Dr. Scott's current research is focused on understanding the development, regulation and maintenance of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in order to design new vaccines and immunotherapies for infectioleishmaniaus diseases.

    The laboratory primarily focuses on experimental murine infections with the protozoan parasite, Leishmania, which provides a well-characterized model of T helper cell differentiation.

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  • Mason Immunotherapy Research Laboratory

    Dr. Mason's lab currently focuses on immunotherapy approaches to treat osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, and lymphoma, among other cancers. 

    Visit Mason Immunotherapy Research...

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  • Volk Laboratory
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    The goals of the Volk laboratory are to understand regulatory mechanisms governing dynamic interactions between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix in the wound healing-fibrosis-cancer progression triad and to apply this knowledge to develop innovative regenerative and oncologic therapies for veterinary and human patients.

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  • Hunter Laboratory

    T gondii in the retina, Hunter Lab

    Dr. Christopher Hunter's research team has been working on various aspects of basic parasitology since 1984.

    For nearly 25 years, Dr. Hunter's team has focused on understanding how the immune response to Toxoplasma gondii is regulated to allow the development of protective immunity as well as to limit T cell mediated pathology in multiple sites including the gut and brain.

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  • ASMG Laboratory - Microbial Genomics

    asmg-lab-new-bolton-center 500

    The Agricultural Systems and Microbial Genomics Laboratory (ASMG Laboratory) was established to support Dr. Dou and Dr. Pitta in their research endeavors.

    Dr. Pitta is the ruminant nutrition and microbiologist at the Center for Animal Health and Productivity (CAHP), New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania.

    Microbial Genomics

    Research in the Microbial Genomics section of the ASMG lab focuses primarily on the gut microbial composition of ruminants, utilizing both culture-based and advanced molecular methodologies. The alimentary tract of a ruminant is colonized by millions of microbes living in a symbiotic relationship with the host. Therefore, knowledge of the microbial composition of the entire gut can provide insights into improving the overall health and productivity of the animal.

    Microbiology Component

    new-bolton-center-asmg-lab-microbial-genomics 400The recent advent of next generation sequencers has greatly enhanced the ability to explore community microbial populations. The ASMG lab has the capabilities to perform metagenomic studies including sample preparation, genomic DNA extraction and generating 16S amplicon libraries for sequencing on next generation platforms. The sequenced data is analyzed at the ASMG laboratory utilizing the appropriate bioinformatics tools for data interpretation. The lab is in the process of streamlining the protocols for generating 18S libraries for protozoa and fungal communities.

     

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